Home
My Account
About Us
Forum
Contact us
الواجهة العربية
epharmaweb.com
Medical News Medical News
Aricles Articles
Events Events
Guidelines Guidelines
Videos Library Videos Library
Diseases Diseases
Follow us : facebook twitter Digg Linkedin Boxiz
Newsletter

Please select the categories you are intersted in:
News Articles Guidelines Events Videos Journals' abstracts

Latest Subscribers
Advanced Search »

Study finds gene "overdose" link to being skinny


Study finds gene

People with extra copies of certain genes are much more likely to be very skinny, scientists said on Wednesday in the first finding of a genetic cause for extreme thinness.

In a study in the journal Nature, researchers from Britain's Imperial College London and the University of Lausanne in Switzerland found that a duplication of a part of chromosome 16 is associated with being underweight.
Previous research has found that people with a missing copy of these genes are 43 times more likely to be morbidly obese.

"This is the first genetic cause of extreme thinness that has been identified," said Philippe Froguel from Imperial's school of public health, who led the study. "It's also the first example of a deletion and a duplication of one part of the genome having opposite effects."
He said one reason this latest finding was important is that it shows that failure to thrive in childhood can be genetically driven. "If a child is not eating, it's not necessarily the parents' fault," he said.

According to the researchers, in around one in 2,000 people, part of chromosome 16 is duplicated, making men 23 times and women five times more likely to be underweight (i.e., body mass index below 18.5 kg/m2).

Froguel's team examined the DNA of more than 95,000 people for their study. They found that half of all children with the duplication in the study had previously been diagnosed with failure to thrive..
A quarter of people with the duplication had microcephaly, which is linked to neurological defects and shorter life expectancy.

Froguel said scientists still have much work to do to find out more about the genes in this region, but their discovery could eventually lead to new potential treatments for obesity and appetite disorders.
"We now plan to sequence these genes and find out what they do, so we can get an idea of which ones are involved in regulating appetite," he said.


اضغط هنا للقراءة باللغة العربية

Prepared by: Scientific Section


Source :

Reuters Health






Other Comments

Add a comment

You must sign in to use this servcie

Username:
Password:


facebook comments

Forgot your password


sign up
Consultants Corner

Yaser Habrawi , F.R.C.S.Ed

Yaser Habrawi , F.R.C.S.Ed Consultant Ophthalmologist

Dr . Dirar Abboud

Dr . Dirar Abboud Hepatologist – Gastroenterologist

Dr. Faisal Dibsi

Dr. Faisal Dibsi Specialist of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Dr. Samer Al-Jneidy

Dr. Samer Al-Jneidy Pediatrician

Samir Moussa M.D.

Samir Moussa M.D. ENT Specialist

Dr. Talal Sabouni

Dr. Talal Sabouni UROLOGY AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANT

Dr. Hani Najjar

Dr. Hani Najjar Pediatrics, Neurology

Dr. Tahsin Martini

Dr. Tahsin Martini Degree status: M.D. in Ophthalmology

Poll

Disclaimer : This site does not endorse or recommend any medical treatment, pharmaceuticals or brand names. More Details