Home
My Account
About Us
Forum
Contact us
الواجهة العربية
epharmaweb.com
Medical News Medical News
Aricles Articles
Events Events
Guidelines Guidelines
Videos Library Videos Library
Diseases Diseases
Follow us : facebook twitter Digg Linkedin Boxiz
Newsletter

Please select the categories you are intersted in:
News Articles Guidelines Events Videos Journals' abstracts

Latest Subscribers
Advanced Search »



Slow Walkers are More likely to Develop Dementia


Slow Walkers are More likely to Develop Dementia

(epharmanews)- Changes in walking speed in late life may signal the early stages of dementia known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to a study published recently in Neurology.

Researchers found that changes in indoors walking speed predict how prone one to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is, which is an early sign of dementia.

The study involved 93 people, all older than 70, living alone. 54 of them had no cognitive impairment while 31 had non-memory related MCI and eight had memory-related MCI.  Participants underwent memory and thinking tests and had their walking speed monitored at their homes unobtrusively over a three-year period.  They then were placed in 3 groups: slow, moderate or fast.

“In our study, we used a new technique that included installing infrared sensors in the ceilings of homes, a system designed to detect walking movement in hallways,” said study author Hiroko Dodge, PhD, with Oregon Health and Science University in Portland and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “By using this new monitoring method, we were able to get a better idea of how even subtle changes in walking speed may correlate with the development of MCI.”

Dodge and co-authors found that the slow walkers were 9 times more likely to be suffering from non-memory related MCI and the amount of the fluctuation in walking speed was also associated with MCI.

“Further studies need to be done using larger groups of participants to determine whether walking speed and its fluctuations could be a predictor of future memory and thinking problems in the elderly,” said Dodge. “If we can detect dementia at its earliest phases, then we can work to maintain people’s independence, provide treatments and ultimately develop ways to prevent the disease from developing. Our in-home monitoring approach has a lot of potential to be used for sustaining independence of the elderly.”


اضغط هنا للقراءة باللغة العربية

Prepared by: Laila Nour


Source :

ePharmaNews






Other Comments

Add a comment

You must sign in to use this servcie

Username:
Password:


facebook comments

Forgot your password


sign up

Consultants Corner

Dr . Dirar Abboud

Dr . Dirar Abboud Hepatologist – Gastroenterologist

Dr. Samer Al-Jneidy

Dr. Samer Al-Jneidy Pediatrician

Dr. Hani Najjar

Dr. Hani Najjar Pediatrics, Neurology

Yaser Habrawi , F.R.C.S.Ed

Yaser Habrawi , F.R.C.S.Ed Consultant Ophthalmologist

Dr. Talal Sabouni

Dr. Talal Sabouni UROLOGY AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANT

Dr. Tahsin Martini

Dr. Tahsin Martini Degree status: M.D. in Ophthalmology

Samir Moussa M.D.

Samir Moussa M.D. ENT Specialist

Dr. Faisal Dibsi

Dr. Faisal Dibsi Specialist of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Poll

Which of the following you are mostly interested in?

Cancer Research
Mental Health
Heart Disease & Diabetes
Sexual Health
Obesity and Healthy Diets
Mother & Child Health

Disclaimer : This site does not endorse or recommend any medical treatment, pharmaceuticals or brand names. More Details