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Cognitive Decline Strongly Linked to Diabetes, Study


Cognitive Decline Strongly Linked to Diabetes, Study

(epharmanews)- Although it is well known for doctors that diabetes is associated with cognitive decline symptoms, a new study is the first to demonstrate that the greater risk of cognitive decline is present among people who develop diabetes later in life. It is also the first study to link the risk of cognitive decline to the severity of diabetes.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the San Francisco VA Medical Center studied more than 3000 adults over 70 beginning in 1997. All the patients provided periodic blood samples and took regular cognitive tests over time.

Hundreds of participants were already diabetic when the study began. Many more became diabetic a decade later while others experienced cognitive decline symptoms. These findings were published recently in Archives of Neurology and they suggest that those two health outcomes were closely linked.

Researchers say that participants who were diabetic when the study began showed faster cognitive decline than those who developed diabetes later on who were also worse than those who did not develop the disease later on.

People who had diabetes at the beginning of the study showed a faster cognitive decline than people who developed it during the course of the study, and these people, in turn, tended to be worse off than people who never developed diabetes at all. The study also showed that patients with more severe diabetes who did not control their blood sugar levels as well suffered faster cognitive declines.

"Both the duration and the severity of diabetes are very important factors," said Kristine Yaffe, MD, the lead author of the study. "It's another piece of the puzzle in terms of linking diabetes to accelerated cognitive aging."

An important question for future studies, she added, would be to ask if interventions that would effectively prevent, delay or better control diabetes would also lower people's risk of cognitive impairment later in life.


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Prepared by: Abdullatief Janat


Source :

ePharmaNews






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